Weekly Devotional & Scripture

The Weekly Devotional is offered by Dan Schmiechen, a member of Linden Hills United Church of Christ.  

 

 

 

LISTENING WITH THE HEART

February 20, 2019

 

The other day I was talking to a new friend.  There was a warm compatibility between us.  He had moved into Parkshore Independent living where we live.   

 

Suddenly, the conversation shifted and he became very personal.  He began talking about the recent death of his wife.  He recounted how they met, their family life and all the strong ways she impacted and influenced his life.

 

Then he spoke of the final hours of her life in the hospital.  He climbed into bed with her and held her in his arms.  Tears flowed.  He went on to say how thankful he was for their life together. 

I kept quiet as he told me his deep sorrow.  When he finished, he made a slight apology for bringing up the story.  I simply thanked him. 

 

I have a hunch many of us have listened to such stories with a family member, a friend or a neighbor.  Coming unannounced, someone shared a story about sadness, grieving or a struggle in their life.  We listened.

 

 We are glad we were there.  No problems were solved.  No advice was given.  We listened with the heart to someone who was hurting.

I also have a hunch we were glad we were there at that time. Listening with the heart was really we all could do.   Someone hurting deep down needed a listening ear.

 

All I can do is to thank God for those times when we were there and listened.

 

“Love….bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.”  I Corinthians 13:7

 

 

-Dan Schmiechen  

The Minstrel Show:  Losing One’s Humanity

February 13. 2019

 

My Dad served an Evangelical and Reformed congregation in a German neighborhood on the south side of St. Louis in the late thirties.   The congregation had an artistic streak performing skits and plays on the stage in the social hall.

 

At one performance, fourteen white men with blackened faces were seated in a semicircle.  In the middle of the semi-circle was a white man whose faced was not blackened.  He led the group singing songs, and telling jokes degrading black people.  Afterwards, I asked my Dad what was going on?

 

 He said what I saw was a form of theater when years ago travelling musicians and actors traveled to cities and towns performing songs, skits and telling stories about the times they lived in.  This Minstrel Show remembered a time in American history when black people were slaves of white people.  Black people were racially caricatured as nobodies and they were stereotyped as less than human.

 

Fast forward to 2019 and we still can’t get rid of these sorrowful pictures of hate and prejudice.  We heard the news that several Virginia politicians painted their faces black as young men and participated in racial hate.  

 

The deeper issue is not only denying one’s neighbor their full humanity but at the same time, losing one’s own humanity.  This kind of prejudiced behavior comes at a high cost.  Heart, mind and soul are irreparably damaged.  Is that the way one wants to live one’s life?

 

Today human beings are expendable and disposable.  Witness separating immigrant children from their parents at the southern border; poor people marginalized; black athletics degraded as less then human and other people casually called “losers” and “animals.”

 

Such behavior ends up damning God who gives life to all people.  Jesus was very clear when he said: “love your neighbor as yourself.”  There is no middle ground and there are no handy options to fall back on.   We are commanded what God wants us to do.

 

My Dad told me God loves all people and God wants to make sure we do, too. The next year there was no Minstrel Show in the congregation.     

 

Prayer: O God, words of friendship and acts of neighborliness are never out of style in your world. 

Help us to never give up to being advocates of good will in the name of Jesus Christ.  Amen.

 

 

-Dan Schmiechen

WRITE YOUR OWN STATE OF THE SOUL REFLECTION

February 6, 2019

 

This week was the State of the Union Address by President Trump to the nation.  No, I’m not going to evaluate the speech or highlight what he said.  I’m going to challenge each one of us to do something more difficult.  I want to raise this question: Will you and I write our own state of the soul reflection back to God?

 

Hear me out.   Why not consider writing to God what is the condition of your soul as you moved deeper into a new year?

 

This is a private conversation of the soul with God.  No one evaluates.  No one intervenes.  No one is privy to what you write down.  One does not read your speech to a neighbor, friend or family member.

 

One can start writing your speech by asking: What is the state of one’s soul? How honest and self-searching can I be?  No shadowboxing.  No staying away from the shadowed valleys of one’s life.  Write with your true heart.  Did I say what I wanted to say?

 

How is the condition of my soul?  Is this my reflection of the soul or what people think of me?   The challenge is this: do I want to open up my soul and be exposed to God’s healing love?  What is it that drags me down in my life?  Why is my soul hampered giving full exposure to God?  

When you have finished your state of the soul, pray over it.  Reflection over it.  Maybe you want to add some new thoughts.  You decide when to read your state of the soul reflection back to God.

 

“Search me, O God and know my heart; test me and know my thoughts.  See if there is any wicked way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.”   Psalm 139: 23

 

-Dan Schmiechen 

 

 

HOLD FAST TO GOD’S GOOD

January 29, 2018

 

I don’t know about you but I’m getting tired having the media and news industry tell me how badly divided our society is.   It gets wearisome being told we live in depravity because people can’t get along with one another.  I ask when haven’t you and I lived in a divided society?

 

If my memory is still working, I can recall the uncertain and turbulent times over the years when our country struggled over such national and local issues as civil rights, homelessness, human sexuality, homosexuality, corruption in government, poverty, and our involvement in wars overseas to name a few. The practicing of democracy is a struggle to find the common ground within a diverse society.

 

What I am saying is this: Jesus never promised following his way of life was going to be easy.  Jesus never promised standing up for the Good News of the Gospel will be convenient.  Jesus never promised witnessing in his name will keep you out of trouble with the status quo.

 

In these chaotic times, the staying power of faith does not come from ourselves but from God’s love in Jesus Christ.  I believe the word is: Hold Fast to Your Faith.  I’m going to find a place in my life where I can witness in the name of Christ.  You and I have to decide where to make that witness.

 

1.       Hold fast means forgiving love can cross barriers; merciful grace can overcome hate; and neighborly acts can bind.  Witness somewhere.

2.       Hold fast means rivals (not enemies) can live together; common problems can be compromised and worked out. Witness somewhere.

3.      Hold fast means to be kind, tolerant and civil.  Witness somewhere.  

4.       Hold fast means neighbors can share trust and live in community.  Witness somewhere.

5.       Hold fast means bridge building and helping one another has not gone out of fashion.  Witness somewhere.

6.       Hold fast means God’s love in Jesus Christ does hold and holds fast. 

 

The New Testament sends us forth with these words

 

“God forth into the world in peace; hold fast to that which is good; render to no person evil for evil; Support the weak, stand with the fainthearted; love and serve the Lord rejoicing in the power of the Holy Spirit.”  Amen.

 


-Dan Schmiechen  

 

 PREFERRING A TABLE OVER A WALL

January 14, 2019

 

 

A wall is a wall.

 

A table is a table is a table is a table is a table is a table is a table.

 

A wall walls up democracy with a callous approach to humane issues.

 

A table spreads democracy to be inclusive.

 

A wall says separate and divide.

 

A table says share together in negotiations – diplomacy still works.

 

A wall offers no future – it is dead end.

 

A table offers a new beginning because you can see the face of a neighbor.

 

A wall speaks of division.

 

A table speaks of possibilities to live together despite differences.

 

A wall announces keep out strangers and foreigners.

 

A table announces who is my neighbor?

 

A wall speaks of exile and isolation.

 

A table speaks of a place for strangers and sojourners.

 

A wall promises a false safety and promises more walls to come.

 

A table promises more room to sit together and hear one another.

 

A wall says I don’t want to meet the world.

 

A table says meet the world and you will be saved from isolation.

 

A wall reminds me of who is worthy and eligible.

 

A table reminds me of those seeking a safe place.   

 

Sit politicians from both major political parties around a table and keep them there until immigration issues are resolved.

 

CHOOSE A TABLE OVER A WALL.

 

-Dan Schmiechen 

 

 

 

“A Cold Coming We Had Of It….Such A Long Journey”

January 9, 2019

 

The English poet T.S. Eliot places these words in the mouth of one of the wise people searching for the Christ Child.   We are not told much about the wise ones.  Only that they are following a star in search for meaning in their lives.  In fact, St. Matthew does not say much about them.   We know nothing about their personal lives.  Racial background is not mentioned.  No names are given.  And there were not three “wise men from the East.”   All we know is that wise people were on a search.

 

As a youth, I never could figure out how these regally clothed travelers with their glorious garments could be so clean and tidy after battling wind storms, sand storms, snow storms, rain storms and heat storms riding camels.  They must have stopped at a dry cleaners before visiting the Christ-child.   

 

 Why were they lead all that way?  Why were we lead all that way? This is a good question for us as we continue our journey of faith into a new year.

 

T.S. Eliot continues “We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation.”  What do we seek?  A stronger faith?  Better family relations?  Better meaning in my job?  More peace and reconciliation in the world?  Being a more forgiving and caring person?   May we learn new Christ like habits that we never imagined before.   Guided by God’s grace, we journey into new country.

 

“And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they left for their own country by another road.”

St. Matthew 2:12

 

 

-Dan Schmiechen

 

STEAL BABY JESUS OR FOLLOW HIM

January 2, 2019

 

If there isn’t enough wackiness in our world, the latest breaking sensational news is that Baby Jesus thefts have occurred from outdoor manger scenes in Alexandria, and St. Cloud, Minnesota and around the state of Minnesota. Is baby Jesus being held for ransom?  Will the budgets of cities and towns crash economically paying high ransoms? 

 

I ask:  Why steal Baby Jesus and not Mary?  I would steal Mary which means in all probability Joseph has to raise Jesus.  I think he would do a good job.  

 

Deeper questions arise.  Is stealing Baby Jesus seeking redemption for past mistakes?  If I stole Baby Jesus and set the figure up in my living room would he help me lead a more faithful life? 

 

Why steal Baby Jesus in the first place?  Is this a practical joke?  Does a symbolic figure of Jesus give me the power to love and forgive in my life?   Will I be the first blessed on the block to steal a Baby Jesus?    

 

Sad to say, stealing a Baby Jesus won’ do it.  Since we Protestants don’t have the holy host array of calendar saints as our Roman Catholic friends do, is this a poor person’s way of finding a grace substitute with a Baby Jesus shrine in one’s backyard?

 

 No, I would rather follow Baby Jesus rather than steal him.  Following the Jesus from a child to a youth to an adult proclaiming the coming of a new order of peace, love and reconciliation is harder to do.  

 

Where was forgiveness practiced?  Who do I include in my family beyond family of origin?  Where can fairness be practiced?  Can love see the light of day?  Is mercy possible?     

 

Let’s not steal Baby Jesus but follow him into a new year.

 

Prayer:

O God, it’s far easier to steal a Baby Jesus from my next-door neighbor’s nativity scene than follow him.   Let the Light of Jesus’ life shine strong in my life so I become who I was meant to be. 

 

A hopeful and strengthening new journey into a fresh new year.

 

-Dan Schmiechen

 

   

 

 

O LITTLE TOWN OF WASHINGTON D.C.

December 26, 2018

 

“The hopes and fears of all the years are met in you tonight.”  These words are never out of date. The past weeks our country has experienced an economic shutdown, change of national leadership and countless refugees are at our border looking for a home – these actions brought stunned reactions from all political persuasions.  The little town of Washington D.C. is giving one of my favorite professions a bad name.  Politicians can do better for the common good than what they are doing.

 

The gospel writers tell us the coming light from a Baby is stronger than the light our world can give.   The world’s light is a weak light and it shines among the privileged and powerful.  The Christmas stories tell us in story after story the world is turned upside down.  Elizabeth beyond child bearing years is to birth John the Baptist.  Mary, an unmarried teenage peasant is to birth Jesus.  The fathers are stunned and one cannot talk.  Good news first comes to the graveyard midnight shift, the hourly paid shepherds and not to the Chamber of Commerce.  Even King Herod a pathological homicidal king is shared the news by wise people tired of tending stocks and bonds and looking for a new life.  They are warned by God to go home on the pre-Interstate system – dirt roads and flee King Herod.  Joseph takes mother and child to safe Egypt.

 

You and I are asked by God to change our lives and sometimes we don’t want to.   What that means is this: a helping hand is preferred over a harming hand; a welcoming voice is preferred over condemning words; a clear word of “I forgive you” opens new roads to travel; an embracing acceptance wins over turning one’s back and walking away; a resolve to throw out a  life line to someone is better than a festering resentment; and a vision that says God loves all defeats a dead end nationalism.

 

“The hopes and fears of all the years are met in you tonight.” 

 

Peace and Power to you this Christmas,

 

 

Dan Schmiechen

REFLECTION:  WORSHIP LITERALLY MEANS LIFE

December 18, 2018

 

 I can think of no more appropriate response than to come to God in prayer to seek justice for a more humane world.   Initially one is stunned to season imagine Sunday morning worship around the clock.  The Advent reminds us this is not a free ride or a free lunch.  We are invited to see the world as God sees the world.  Sometimes we don’t want to heartache justice and sometimes we want to see Jesus justice for all.  Let these days remind us we do not walk alone on this path and we do not rely upon our own strength.  God is always present no matter what.  see That is one reminder of the Second Sunday in Advent.   

 

 

 

Your Reflection (Daily Scripture Reading)

Sunday, December 16 - Mathew 11:2-ll

Monday, December 17-   Mark 13:1-13, 24-37

Tuesday, December 18-  Luke 21:25-36

Wednesday, December- 19  Revelation 1:-8

Thursday, December 20- Ezekiel 34:1-10

Friday, December 21-  Luke 12:35-48

Saturday, December 22-  Acts 1:1-11

 

 

 PRAYER: Amid the contrasts of joy and sorrow, heartache and hope, love and hate, O God help us to  shape a faith to guide, a witness to enlighten so that we may trust Christ’s love for the world.  It’s not that we don’t have good intentions but it’s the darn follow through.  Move us from the world’s darkness to the Gospel Light this Advent.   Amen. 

 

-Dan Schmiechen                                                           

Advent 4: THE DARKNESS

December 17, 2018

 

I’ll never forget it.  I sat in a canoe with a friend at twilight on a lake in the upper reaches of Quetico, the Canadian wilderness.  Night was falling.  No wind.  No loon or owl calls.  A deafening silence enveloped us.  My friend suggested we open our mouths to listen to the coming night.  We were mesmerized.

 

I want to say a good word about darkness.  Darkness can hide unwise motives and unhealthy acts.  I won’t deny that.  But there is another side of this Advent darkness that speaks of promises to come into your life and mine.  Darkness can offer a time to observe what was done in our lives for one day.

 

Darkness can help us imagine what can be seen in the coming day.  This time can become a new faith rhythm to our lives.  Darkness is as natural as light.  Darkness can offer a new walk into what a new day may be.  Darkness brings a benediction and a promise to come.

 

Lighting a fourth candle in our home can be a time not only to hold back the night but a time to welcome the night, to rest from our labors, to sleep and rise to a new time. Let God work within.  “God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night.”    Genesis 1:5

 

-Dan Schmiechen    

 

 

Advent 3: Silence and Prayers of Linden Hills People 2018

December 12, 2018

 

Low sun in Minnesota means longer shadows.  Less sunlight also means weaker light.  The December days are more cloudy.  Deer eat five pounds of food for every 100 pounds of weight.  Now they browse on twigs from sugar maples, red-osier dogwood shrubs, and northern white cedar trees.  Snow cleans the landscape.  Frost patterns appear on windows.  Listen to black capped chickadees and downy woodpeckers.

 

A Reflection: When Worship Literally Means Life

 

A Protestant Dutch church has scheduled worship services every hour on the hour, twenty-four hours day for a month.   Is this the result of an overzealous Board of Deacons?  NO.

 

The congregation is trying to prevent the deportation of a family of five Armenians back to their homeland after living in Holland for nine years.  A high court ruled it is safe to go back home.  The family fears for their lives.

 

According to Dutch law, the police are not allowed to enter a church sanctuary where there are uninterrupted services.  The family lives in the church building.  Clergy from historic faith traditions lead worship, people provide food and moral support through worship.  The congregation seeks citizenship for the family.

 

There is no more an appropriate response than to come to God in prayer, hear scripture and sermons to seek justice for a more humane world.  In worship, we are always invited to see the world as God sees the world.  Sometimes we don’t want see and hear human need crying out for help and sometimes we want to see Jesus justice for all.  Let there days remind us we do not walk alone on the path and we do not rely on our own strength.   God is always present no matter what.  This is one reminder of Advent 3.

 

Your Reflection (Daily Scripture Reading)

Sunday, December 16 - Mathew 11:2-ll

Monday, December 17-   Mark 13:1-13, 24-37

Tuesday, December 18-  Luke 21:25-36

Wednesday, December- 19  Revelation 1:-8

Thursday, December 20- Ezekiel 34:1-10

Friday, December 21-  Luke 12:35-48

Saturday, December 22-  Acts 1:1-11

 

Prayer: Amid the contrasts of joy and sorrow, heartache and hope, love and hate, O God walk us on a clear path to the manger.  It’s not that we don’t have good intentions but it’s the darn follow through.  Move us from the world’s darkness to the Gospel’s Light.  Amen.

 

 

-Dan Schmiechen

Advent 2: Silence and Prayers of Linden Hills People 2018

December 4, 2018

 

 

Thousands of ponds and lakes are freezing over.  Snow falls.  Tree leaves are down.  Remember it takes over 4 inches of ice in contact with stationary water for safe walking, cross country skiing and fishing.  Breathe in the December air.  Listen for wintering birds.  Darkness descends.

 

 

A Reflection: We gasp at the mood, and meaning of the seasons.  Moving from Thanksgiving to unapologetic greed on Black Friday, we now find ourselves waiting for the Christ Child.  Plan for an alternative Christmas – here are some ideas:

*Offer child care to a family   

*Read a book to someone   

*Help out with Christmas Pageant

*Invite someone over for tea or coffee   

*Give money to an environmental group

*Help out in a food shelf   

*Have someone for breakfast or lunch   

*Bake scones, and cookies as gifts

*Play a table game with someone  

*Phone a lost relative  

*Take a walk in a park

 

Let your imagination be creative for Christmas.

 

Your Reflection (Daily Scripture Reading)

Monday, December 10 Luke 1:5-25 57-80

Tuesday, December 11 Matthew 4:1-6; 28: 18-20

Wednesday, December 12 Matthew 3:1-12

Thursday, December 13 Isaiah 62

Friday, December 14 John 1:6-34

Saturday, December 15 Mark 1:1-8

Sunday, December 16 Luke 3: 1-6                 

                                                                                                       

Daily Prayer

As darkness descends covering more daylight, O God open a path for us to walk.   May our walked paths this Advent be true and faithful to whose we are.  Amen.         

 

Add your own prayers.         

     

 

-Dan Schmiechen

Advent 1: Silence and Prayers of Linden Hills People 2018

November 26, 2018

 

As the sun tilts away from the earth, we enter a winter of darkness.  Advent is four weeks before Christmas,  It means "the coming of Christ."  Each week, we move closer to the Light of Christ coming to lighten our darkness.  May this Advent season enrich and grow our faith and lives.

 

PREPARATION

 

* Find a quiet place at home.  Light a candle.  Read scripture.

 

*Pray the prayer and add your own.

 

Advent 1 Scriptures

Monday, December 3- Matthew 3

Tuesday, December 4- Colossians 1: 9-23

Wednesday, December 5- John 8: 33-37

Thursday, December 6- Isaiah 43: 1-21

Friday, December 7- Hebrews 10: 11-15

Saturday, December 8- Zephanian 3: 14-20

Sunday, December 9- Psalm 25: 1-10, Luke 21: 25-36

 

Daily Prayer

Clamorous, O Lord, is this season of your birth, this snowfall air with your love in it, this darkened time ablaze with more than light, this age of strife suddenly abound with peace, these days brim with innocence, this year upon its knees, this good time of preparation.  O Light of Life, let us arise to know your mornings in our nights.  In Christ's name.  Amen

 

Add your own prayers.

 

-Dan Schmiechen

 

THE TAMARACK TREE 

November 19, 2018

 

One mile south from our family cabin up north is Tamarack River.  The river is named after the tamarack tree stacked up in the bogs alongside the river.  The tree is rooted in sphagnum moss, shallow in depth and short in size.  The needles are twelve to twenty in a bunch and need the full force of the sun to survive.

 

In the fall the tree loses all its needles.  The needles turn a smoky gold.  Does the tree belong in coniferous or deciduous tree family? Tree experts can’t make up their minds but the fallen needles are an eye full of delight until the snow covers the landscape.

 

While humans do not shed their skin every year, the tamarack tree is a reminder for us to grow new habits over faulty ones; grow a deeper faith over a timid faith; grow a practice of forgiveness over a hesitant one and grow a compassion to include more people. 

 

The Tamarack tree reminds us there is unfinished work to do in our lives that maybe we neglected during the past summer.  You and I know what those unhealthy traits are because we have lingering regrets.

 

Was it dealing with a cantankerous family member?  Was it struggling to listen to someone who was pouring out their heart?  Was it balking to help someone or to include someone in our circle of friends?  Was it seeing a demeaning racist act and being hesitant to speak out against it?    

You and I can so easily postpone the changes needed in our lives.  Only God knows that.   As the Tamarack tree sheds all it’s needles every year, where can we begin to make changes in our lives?

 

“Happy are those who do not follow the advice of the wicked, or take the path that sinners tread…..but their delight is in the law of the Lord….they are like trees planted by streams of water, which yield their fruit in its season.” 

From Psalm 1

 

 

 

Looking for Grace

November 13, 2018

   

One takes no delight over the sex abuse scandal that has fallen upon the Roman Catholic Church.  If the Roman Catholic Church ever needed the Protestant principle of confessional reform, it needs it now over misconduct by priests, bishops and cardinals.

 

The depth and intensity of such moral collapse staggers the imagination.  Yet, I offer a word of caution of jumping into reforms too quickly without examining faith, heart and soul.  Yes, reparations are needed to the countless abused.  Yes, reform is needed.  Yes, jail time is needed for the guilty.

 

Numerous redemption ideas have been offered ranging from ordaining women priests; bringing in outside professionals to offer their insights; empowering the laity to take a more active role ordering church life and the resignation of the entire American episcopacy.  There is the danger of jumping into needed reforms too quickly without confession.

 

Here is a lesson for all Christians.  We believe only God can bring about change through converted hearts.  We are fooled into believing when a crisis or a problem emerges in the Christian Church, we set up a task force to reform.  Yes, task forces have their place.  But we are not talking a fire sale redemption and quickly get over it.  Here the Christian Church must stay true to the message: confession means redemption from the basement to the roof for a house of faith.

 

Armies of lawyers and public consultants cannot do this.  They have their place but the Christian Church majors in reconciliation placing itself in the hands of God.  After all, that’s what we believe isn’t it? 

 

What happened to the Roman Catholic stands as a warning to all Christians.  God is not mocked by perverse human behavior in the Christian Church.  New beginnings can only happen when confession leads to healing. Only then can one find grace again and breathe in life changing power.

 

“Create in me a clean heart, O God

and put a new and right spirit within me. 

Do not cast me away from her presence,

and do not take your holy spirit from me. 

Restore to me the joy of your salvation,

and sustain in me a willing spirit.” 

 

Psalm 51:10-12

 

 

-Dan Schmiechen

BE A WITNESS FOR GOD's GOOD

October 31, 2018

 

Nobody is shy being a witness today.  The demons of uncontrolled vitriolic hate has gone mainstream where people are shot and killed in a Pittsburgh Synagogue; where leaders of a national political party are targeted for assassination and where two black people are shot and killed in a Kentucky grocery store.  Frighteningly, America is becoming a nation for the few.

 

What is happening to America when filth laden hate is launched against cultural and racial groups?  What is happening to America when self-appointed and privileged white people unleash rants and rages against the poor and underclass as “losers.  What is happening to America when immigrants are labeled as criminals and undesirables.  This evil brew of denying people their God given humanity leads to the twisted propaganda that Jesus was a white man and blesses only white people. Frighteningly, America is becoming a nation for the few. 

 

Together, can we witness and stand for the common good?  As a child in Sunday School, my favorite song was Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus.  Well, that’s where Christians are now in these times.  Stand up for Jesus by witnessing to God’s good.  We who embrace the Christian faith need to witness stronger to God’s love in Jesus Christ.   Why let these voices of purgatory hate have the last word?  Why let some people attack the very tenets of democracy by prosecuting God’s love for neighbor?  Let’s unashamedly be:  

 

*More forgiving and understanding with family, neighbors and friends.

 

*More faithful in standing by those abused and made outcasts by hate.

 

*More caring to share in grief and support victims of racial hate.

 

*More loving of the unlovable.

 

*More willing to serve than be served.

 

Can we get witnesses for the common good in the name of Jesus Christ?     

 

Prayer: O God may the words of my mouth and the meditations of my heart be acceptable in your sight,

O God my strength and my redeemer.  Amen.

 

-Dan Schmiechen